Comprehensive Physiology Wiley Online Library

Pulmonary Excretion of Absorbed Gases

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Abstract

The sections in this article are:

1 Factors Involved in Inert Gas Exchange
1.1 Solubility Effect
1.2 Interaction of Ventilation, Blood Flow, and Solubility
1.3 Measurements
2 Transport of Carbon Monoxide
3 Exposure to Exogenous Carbon Monoxide
4 Endogenous Production of Carbon Monoxide
5 Elimination of Carbon Monoxide
5.1 Theory: Steady State
5.2 Theory: Unsteady State
5.3 Experimental Verification
6 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
6.1 Treatment
6.2 Physiological Alterations
Figure 1. Figure 1.

Effects of ventilation and perfusion on clearance of a poorly soluble gas (xenon) and a highly soluble gas (ether). Abscissa indicates perfusion (1/min); ordinate represents ventilation (1/min). Dotted isopleths indicate xenon clearance; solid isopleths indicate ether clearance.

From Farhi
Figure 2. Figure 2.

Relation between inert gas retention, , and blood : gas partition coefficient. Ventilation‐perfusion ratios are indicated next to each isopleth. Blood : gas partition coefficients of some common inert gases are indicated by arrows.

From Wagner et al.
Figure 3. Figure 3.

Effects of endogenous and exogenous variables on blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation. Unless otherwise noted, , 4 1·min−1; Dl, 30 ml · min−1 · mmHg−1; , 100 mmHg. Left panel, effects of changes on HbCO saturation resulting from endogenous production: , alveolar ventilation; Dl, diffusing capacity; , mean capillary oxygen tension, Right panel, effect of inspired CO concentration from exogenous sources on carboxyhemoglobin saturation.

From Coburn et al.
Figure 4. Figure 4.

Effect of alveolar ventilation and mean pulmonary capillary oxygen tension on calculated half times. Half time is time required to reach a point midway between the new and old steady state. , 4 1 · min−1; Dl, 30 ml · min−1 · mmHg−1; , 100 mmHg; blood volume, 5,000 ml; [HbO2], total hemoglobin concentration less [HbCO], unless otherwise noted.

From Coburn et al.


Figure 1.

Effects of ventilation and perfusion on clearance of a poorly soluble gas (xenon) and a highly soluble gas (ether). Abscissa indicates perfusion (1/min); ordinate represents ventilation (1/min). Dotted isopleths indicate xenon clearance; solid isopleths indicate ether clearance.

From Farhi


Figure 2.

Relation between inert gas retention, , and blood : gas partition coefficient. Ventilation‐perfusion ratios are indicated next to each isopleth. Blood : gas partition coefficients of some common inert gases are indicated by arrows.

From Wagner et al.


Figure 3.

Effects of endogenous and exogenous variables on blood carboxyhemoglobin saturation. Unless otherwise noted, , 4 1·min−1; Dl, 30 ml · min−1 · mmHg−1; , 100 mmHg. Left panel, effects of changes on HbCO saturation resulting from endogenous production: , alveolar ventilation; Dl, diffusing capacity; , mean capillary oxygen tension, Right panel, effect of inspired CO concentration from exogenous sources on carboxyhemoglobin saturation.

From Coburn et al.


Figure 4.

Effect of alveolar ventilation and mean pulmonary capillary oxygen tension on calculated half times. Half time is time required to reach a point midway between the new and old steady state. , 4 1 · min−1; Dl, 30 ml · min−1 · mmHg−1; , 100 mmHg; blood volume, 5,000 ml; [HbO2], total hemoglobin concentration less [HbCO], unless otherwise noted.

From Coburn et al.
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How to Cite

Robert A. Klocke. Pulmonary Excretion of Absorbed Gases. Compr Physiol 2011, Supplement 26: Handbook of Physiology, Reactions to Environmental Agents: 555-562. First published in print 1977. doi: 10.1002/cphy.cp090135