Comprehensive Physiology Wiley Online Library

Aging: Current Concepts

Full Article on Wiley Online Library



Abstract

The sections in this article are:

1 Aging at The Population Level
1.1 Life Tables
1.2 Survival Curves
1.3 Maximum Life Span
1.4 Age‐Specific Mortality Rates
1.5 Universality of Aging
2 Aging at the Individual Level
3 Concept of Primary Aging Processes
3.1 Classification of Theories of Aging
3.2 Genetic Programs Akin to Development and Morphogenesis
3.3 Homeostatic Failure
3.4 Current Status of the Concept of Primary Aging Processes
4 Evolutionary Biology of Aging
5 Manifestations of Aging Processes
5.1 Age‐Associated Disease Processes
5.2 Age‐Associated Physiological Changes
6 Summary and Conclusions
Figure 1. Figure 1.

Survival curves for United States population (men and women) in 1910 and 1970.

Reproduced from Fries and Crapo with permission. Data for 1910 are from United States vital statistics reported in L. I. Dublin “The Possibility of Extending Human Life” in The Harvey Lectures, 1922–1923; data for 1970 are from Vital Statistics of the United States National Center for Health Statistics, 1970
Figure 2. Figure 2.

The age‐specific mortality rate (number of deaths per year per 1,000 individuals entering each age interval) is shown for year intervals from birth to 100 years for the United States population (men and women) in the years 1910 and 1970.

Reproduced from Fries and Crapo with permission. Data for 1910 are from United States vital statistics reported in L. I. Dublin “The Possibility of Extending Human Life” in The Harvey Lectures, 1922–1923; data for 1970 are from Vital Statistics of the United States National Center for Health Statistics, 1970
Figure 3. Figure 3.

The age‐specific mortality rate (number of deaths per year per 100,000 white population) in females and males of the United States in 1976.

Reproduced from Hazzard with permission
Figure 4. Figure 4.

Age changes in human physiological systems based on cross‐sectional studies.

Figure prepared by Shock . Reproduced with permission


Figure 1.

Survival curves for United States population (men and women) in 1910 and 1970.

Reproduced from Fries and Crapo with permission. Data for 1910 are from United States vital statistics reported in L. I. Dublin “The Possibility of Extending Human Life” in The Harvey Lectures, 1922–1923; data for 1970 are from Vital Statistics of the United States National Center for Health Statistics, 1970


Figure 2.

The age‐specific mortality rate (number of deaths per year per 1,000 individuals entering each age interval) is shown for year intervals from birth to 100 years for the United States population (men and women) in the years 1910 and 1970.

Reproduced from Fries and Crapo with permission. Data for 1910 are from United States vital statistics reported in L. I. Dublin “The Possibility of Extending Human Life” in The Harvey Lectures, 1922–1923; data for 1970 are from Vital Statistics of the United States National Center for Health Statistics, 1970


Figure 3.

The age‐specific mortality rate (number of deaths per year per 100,000 white population) in females and males of the United States in 1976.

Reproduced from Hazzard with permission


Figure 4.

Age changes in human physiological systems based on cross‐sectional studies.

Figure prepared by Shock . Reproduced with permission
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Edward J. Masoro. Aging: Current Concepts. Compr Physiol 2011, Supplement 28: Handbook of Physiology, Aging: 3-21. First published in print 1995. doi: 10.1002/cphy.cp110101