Comprehensive Physiology Wiley Online Library

Angiogenesis

Full Article on Wiley Online Library



Abstract

The sections in this article are:

1 Formation of New Vessels
1.1 Cells
1.2 Processes
1.3 The Angiogenic Switch
2 Promoters of Angiogenesis
2.1 The principal growth factors
2.2 Other pro‐angiogenic modulators
3 Inhibitors of Angiogenesis
3.1 Proteins and Protein Fragments
3.2 Extracellular Matrix Components
3.3 Miscellaneous Endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors
4 Vascular Patterning
Figure 1. Figure 1.

Blood vessels in whole mounts of mouse ear skin, as stained by perfusion of biotinylated lectin (Lycopersicon esculentum) followed by diaminobenzidine–peroxidase reaction. Perfused lectin binds to the luminal surface of the endothelium. Shown are the microvessels feeding the hair follicles. (A) Normal microvessels in wild type mouse. (B) Increased number of vessels in transgenic K14‐VEGF mouse. (C) Increased size of vessels in K14‐Angiopoietin‐I mouse (Figure provided by Gavin Thurston. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals).

Figure 2. Figure 2.

Domain structure of FGF receptors.

Figure 3. Figure 3.

FGF and FGF receptors. Based on data published in Ref. and summarized on the website http://molecool.wustl.edu/ornitzlab/fgf.data.htm (See page 5 in colour section at the back of the book)

Figure 4. Figure 4.

VEGF and VEGF Receptors.

Figure 5. Figure 5.

Ribbon diagram of the crystal structure of an ELR chemokine, showing the ELR motif (depicted as ball and stick).

Adapted from: Protein Data Base: PDB code: 1IKL. Rajarathnam K, Clark‐Lewis I and Sykes BD. 1H NMR solution structure of an active monomeric inter‐leukin‐8. Biochemistry 34(): 12983–12990, 1995.
Figure 6. Figure 6.

Domain structure of Del‐1.

Figure 7. Figure 7.

Domain structure of ephrin and eph receptors.



Figure 1.

Blood vessels in whole mounts of mouse ear skin, as stained by perfusion of biotinylated lectin (Lycopersicon esculentum) followed by diaminobenzidine–peroxidase reaction. Perfused lectin binds to the luminal surface of the endothelium. Shown are the microvessels feeding the hair follicles. (A) Normal microvessels in wild type mouse. (B) Increased number of vessels in transgenic K14‐VEGF mouse. (C) Increased size of vessels in K14‐Angiopoietin‐I mouse (Figure provided by Gavin Thurston. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals).



Figure 2.

Domain structure of FGF receptors.



Figure 3.

FGF and FGF receptors. Based on data published in Ref. and summarized on the website http://molecool.wustl.edu/ornitzlab/fgf.data.htm (See page 5 in colour section at the back of the book)



Figure 4.

VEGF and VEGF Receptors.



Figure 5.

Ribbon diagram of the crystal structure of an ELR chemokine, showing the ELR motif (depicted as ball and stick).

Adapted from: Protein Data Base: PDB code: 1IKL. Rajarathnam K, Clark‐Lewis I and Sykes BD. 1H NMR solution structure of an active monomeric inter‐leukin‐8. Biochemistry 34(): 12983–12990, 1995.


Figure 6.

Domain structure of Del‐1.



Figure 7.

Domain structure of ephrin and eph receptors.

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How to Cite

Mary E Gerritsen. Angiogenesis. Compr Physiol 2011, Supplement 9: Handbook of Physiology, The Cardiovascular System, Microcirculation: 351-383. First published in print 2008. doi: 10.1002/cphy.cp020408