Comprehensive Physiology Wiley Online Library

Effects of Altered Vitamin and Mineral Nutritional Status on Temperature Regulation and Thermogenesis in the Cold

Full Article on Wiley Online Library



Abstract

The sections in this article are:

1 Vitamins
1.1 Thiamin
2 Minerals
2.1 Iron
2.2 Copper
2.3 Zinc
2.4 Iodine
3 Summary
Figure 1. Figure 1.

Food consumption and rectal temperature during thiamine depletion and repletion. Solid line, control; dashed line, pair‐fed, dotted line, thiamine‐deficient. Horizontal arrows indicate feeding control diet to thiamine‐deficient rats; vertical arrows indicate treatment of thiamine‐deficient rats with 50 μg thiamine.

Reproduced by permission of the National Research Council of Canada
Figure 2. Figure 2.

Effects of thiamine supplementation on hypothermia and neurological symptoms in a patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy. From Macaron et al. , with permission.

Figure 3. Figure 3.

Core temperature change in iron‐deficient (ID) and control (CN) rats exposed to 4°C for 6 h at different stages of the estrous cycle (proestrus, P; estrus, E; metestrus, M; diestrus, D) or in ovariectomized (OVX) rats.

Reprinted with permission of Butterworth‐Heinemann
Figure 4. Figure 4.

Relationship between mean oxygen uptake () and mean rectal temperature (Tre) of women acutely exposed to cold during iron deficiency and after iron repletion and supplementation. NST refers to nonshivering thermogenesis. From Lukaski et al. , with permission.

Figure 5. Figure 5.

Urinary norepinephrine excretion in iron‐deficient children before and after treatment with iron dextran. Adapted from Voorhess et al. .

Figure 6. Figure 6.

Longitudinal measures of rectal temperature and plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in copper‐deficient and copper‐adequate male rats. Adapted from Hall et al. . *Significantly different (p <0.05) than other treatments.

Figure 7. Figure 7.

Rectal temperature in zinc‐deficient, control (zinc‐adequate), and pair‐fed rats exposed to a 4°C cold stress. From Lukaski et al. , with permission. *Significantly different (p <0.05) than other treatments.



Figure 1.

Food consumption and rectal temperature during thiamine depletion and repletion. Solid line, control; dashed line, pair‐fed, dotted line, thiamine‐deficient. Horizontal arrows indicate feeding control diet to thiamine‐deficient rats; vertical arrows indicate treatment of thiamine‐deficient rats with 50 μg thiamine.

Reproduced by permission of the National Research Council of Canada


Figure 2.

Effects of thiamine supplementation on hypothermia and neurological symptoms in a patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy. From Macaron et al. , with permission.



Figure 3.

Core temperature change in iron‐deficient (ID) and control (CN) rats exposed to 4°C for 6 h at different stages of the estrous cycle (proestrus, P; estrus, E; metestrus, M; diestrus, D) or in ovariectomized (OVX) rats.

Reprinted with permission of Butterworth‐Heinemann


Figure 4.

Relationship between mean oxygen uptake () and mean rectal temperature (Tre) of women acutely exposed to cold during iron deficiency and after iron repletion and supplementation. NST refers to nonshivering thermogenesis. From Lukaski et al. , with permission.



Figure 5.

Urinary norepinephrine excretion in iron‐deficient children before and after treatment with iron dextran. Adapted from Voorhess et al. .



Figure 6.

Longitudinal measures of rectal temperature and plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in copper‐deficient and copper‐adequate male rats. Adapted from Hall et al. . *Significantly different (p <0.05) than other treatments.



Figure 7.

Rectal temperature in zinc‐deficient, control (zinc‐adequate), and pair‐fed rats exposed to a 4°C cold stress. From Lukaski et al. , with permission. *Significantly different (p <0.05) than other treatments.

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Henry C. Lukaski, Scott M. Smith. Effects of Altered Vitamin and Mineral Nutritional Status on Temperature Regulation and Thermogenesis in the Cold. Compr Physiol 2011, Supplement 14: Handbook of Physiology, Environmental Physiology: 1437-1455. First published in print 1996. doi: 10.1002/cphy.cp040263